Datics AI - Future of Voice-Driven Coding

Future of Voice-Driven Coding

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9 min read

Future of Voice-Driven Coding

As we see AI increasingly enter the business world, our interactions with machines are starting to evolve. Companies like Salesforce are exploring new ways for AI to have a more direct impact on customers. This shift could potentially redefine the customer experience as we know it.

In the future, AI will change how we work in many ways. For example, it will be very useful for identifying customers who are likely to churn or buy. However, this is just one potential application of AI. There are many other ways that AI could help us in the future.

Salesforce’s journey into the world of AI began in 2016 with the launch of its Einstein AI framework. Rather than being a standalone product, Einstein was designed as a set of intelligence capabilities that could be integrated into every aspect of the Salesforce stack. The original team that developed Einstein has mostly moved on, but the work continues.

When former Stanford professor Silvio Savarese was brought on as Salesforce’s chief scientist a year ago, he saw it as an opportunity to pursue advanced research with vast datasets that he wouldn’t have been able to pursue in his academic life. With a big staff and ample resources at his disposal, Savarese has been able to make significant progress in his field.

In order to achieve such a broad goal, Silvio and his 100-person research team have created CodeGen. Voice-driven programming, or CodeGen, is an AI-based approach to programming that allows users to describe what they want to do in natural language. Code is then generated based on these instructions. This approach is designed to make programming more accessible and easy to use for a wider range of people.

What he means by this is that when you ask for a particular action, the AI will ask for further clarification prompting a back and forth similar to the example listed below, taken from a Salesforce blog post:

Example of conversational coding from Salesforce using CodeGen tool.

CodeGen is an experimental project that is making progress in developing models that would be suitable for two distinct audiences. The goal is to address experienced developers and those with no coding experience. CodeGen will assist experienced developers with writing code and take over manual portions of the processing. It will also give those with no coding experience a way to build software to solve real problems.

Salesforce is working on something called conversational coding, which is a new way of programming that is based on conversation instead of traditional code. This is something that Microsoft is also working on with their GPT3 framework, but Salesforce is taking it to a new level with deep learning at scale. This involves extremely complex models that can learn and improve over time.

CodeGen is a powerful tool for coding that is built on a massive autoregressive model. This model is trained with a large amount of data and can bifurcate the use cases with samples for the model based on whether the user is experienced or a non-coder. This makes CodeGen an essential tool for any coder, regardless of experience.

The next step would be to release it to the Salesforce internal developer community, while the project is in the proof-of-concept stage, that will happen while Savarese presents findings to an internal conference later in the month.

As data becomes increasingly complex, it is becoming more difficult for businesses to make sense of it all. Tableau, a company Salesforce acquired in 2019 for almost $16 billion, would allow businesses to create programs that make data more accessible and easier to understand from a business perspective. 

 

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